Yumi Notohara

Host institute: University of Helsinki, Finland

Area of research: The Musical Expression and Reception of “Hiroshima” during the Cold War in Europe: Focusing on Aaltonen’s second symphony “Hiroshima”

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[My] research project [focused] on the Finnish composer Errki Aaltonen's (1910-90) second symphony, "Hiroshima" (hereafter "Hiroshima Symphony"). Composed and first performed in 1949 shortly after the atomic bomb was dropped in Hiroshima, "Hiroshima Symphony" is historically significant as "the first instrumental music" expressing "Hiroshima." It was a great pleasure to carry out my research in Finland through the kind assistance of professor Eero Tarasti and the staff of the institution. All of them graciously offered me help whenever I needed it. In addition, the librarians of the Finnish National Library where I studied related materials gave me useful information and good advice. Most of the people in Finland, especially in the academic society, can use English very fluently, so I did not face any difficulty in communicating with other people both in my academic and private life there. During my research periods, I got to know many scholars not only from my host university but also from the other institutions through conferences and my research travels. I have maintained contact with them, and plan to continue my research in the same university this autumn, for which I have already been consented by the professor Tarasti. In addition, my status as a Research Fellow in the Canon Foundation in Europe was very helpful in carrying out my research, especially when I needed to send inquiries and requests to the institutions. Since my research area covered several European countries, this status played a role in terms of certification.

Yumi Notohara